Dewey Turner

deweyheadDewey Turner considers himself a positive person. If you’re fortunate to spend time with him you’ll agree with that assessment. There’s a twinkle to his eyes that gives away his friendliness, a quickness to his wit that gets you laughing. He possesses a tender heart and a deep love of family.

Nineteen years after graduating from Fort Bragg High School, Dewey is living the life he always dreamed. He’s married with two daughters (ages three and thirteen), living in a house he bought a few blocks from his alma mater. He’s the operations manager of FloBeds, a custom mattress business started by his father 47 years ago. For the first time ever he feels balanced, content and happy.

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Dewey arrived with his family from the Bay Area to start sixth grade at Fort Bragg Middle School in 1993. According to him, “I adjusted quickly and made new friends. It helped that I played basketball, which gave me an instant identity.” In high school, he became a star player and his outgoing nature made him the life of the party. He reveled in being a big fish in a small pond.

“I loved growing up here. The teachers and community were supportive and caring. Life was good.”

After graduating in 1999, he went to Sonoma State where he planned to major in kinesiology. He didn’t like the courses and changed his major to communications and radio broadcasting.

“I was blown away by living away from home. I felt free to do anything I wanted. I made a lot of friends. If you lived on campus, you knew Dewey Turner. If you asked the professors about a student named Dewey Turner, they never heard of him.” He laughed. “After a year in the dorms, my partying lifestyle made me ineligible to live in student housing. During my first year off campus, I got into some trouble and had a wakeup call.”

This caused him to realize his purpose for being in college was to get an education, not to party. He began to focus on school and made the Dean’s List.

He also tried out for the basketball team. He hadn’t played for nearly two years—since his high school season ended. “I made the cut from 40 guys to 30 to 20. In the end, 15 got on the team. I was number 16.” He was asked to redshirt, meaning he’d spend the season on the bench.  “After that, I quit. I didn’t want to play at all.”

With the loss of his basketball identity, he returned to his carousing and mediocre student ways. However, he did become the sports editor for the college newspaper and started a radio show—“Hip Hop & Jock Radio.”

Like many people I’ve interviewed, Dewey returned to Fort Bragg after college to figure out his next move. “In 2003 I started work in the manufacturing and shipping departments at FloBeds. I was also the host of the Giants’ games for KMFB.

“I was coasting through life spending too much time partying. After a couple years my dad had a serious sit down with me. He asked me to think about what I wanted and where I was going. I made a complete 180 and dedicated myself to the family business.”

He continued to search for an identity. “I was white-knuckling it, trying to use the tool belt I’d gathered from my experiences to help me make good decisions, yet I was floundering. In an effort to find something to feed my need to be competitive, I played city rec league basketball, but that only got me through the winters. In 2007, I finally found what I was looking for in golf.

deweygolf“I was horrible at it, but figured if I practiced enough I’d get good.” He played five nights a week until dark and most weekends. He joined a golf tour and entered tournaments around Northern California. In 2012, he qualified for the national championship tournament at TPC Sawgrass in Florida and came in eighth among 150 entrants. That same year, he earned the title of Sacramento Player of the Year. In 2013 and again in 2017, he won the Little River Inn Golf Club Championship.

Dewey became the Operations Manager of FloBeds in 2009. Work and golf kept him busy, but his life felt unbalanced. “I always wanted a family and in September 2012 I met a wonderful woman—Jamie Fales. We fell in love and moved in together. She and her daughter Ali changed me. I realized I needed to be needed. The pieces of my life came together. I finally had what I’d wanted for so long.”

deweyjamieDewey and Jamie’s first date included Ali. They went to Mackerricher State Park beach and Jenny’s Giant Burger. “I knew I wanted them in my life forever. Ali and I have a special relationship. She’s truly my first daughter.”

Dewey’s life became more complete with the birth of his and Jamie’s daughter Mackenzie on Thanksgiving Day 2014. “That moment changed my life,” he said with a hand to his heart. “I have two daughters. I’m a dad now and that’s all that matters.”

After the birth of Mackenzie, he slowed down on golf. “I’m a weekend warrior now, also playing a couple times a week during the spring and summer. Jamie and I are a team and allow each other the ability to pursue activities we’re passionate about.

“The Christmas after Mackenzie was born, Jamie got a Fitbit. This encouraged her to start working out. She eventually attended Bethany Brewer’s morning boot camps. Before long she was competing in triathlons and Spartan races. She placed third in the recent 70.4-mile Long Beach Bayshore Triathlon.”

In the meantime, Dewey became the assistant Fort Bragg High School boys’ varsity basketball coach. “I’ve also continued to play rec league basketball alongside my mentor Tim Anderson. Our team, sponsored by FloBeds, has won the last three men’s league titles.”

deweydaveDewey loves Fort Bragg and the life he’s built since his return. “It seems our town needs to find its identity over and over again. So much of our future depends on how the mill site is developed. We need to keep opening our minds to change.”

He appreciates learning the business from his dad. “We’re always trying to innovate in order to maintain our success. Our slogan is ‘Every body’s built differently, their mattress should be too.’ Most of our business is done online and it’s a challenge to constantly figure out how to grow that presence.”

Dewey defines himself as a family man first. He is raising his girls to reach their full potential. Second is his work with FloBeds. “My family and our employees’ families depend on this, and I aim to carry on my father’s legacy. I’m proud to be his right hand, taking over his life’s work.” Then he lists basketball coaching and last being a golfer/basketball player—two things which a short time ago held higher priority on this list.

Thank you Dewey for returning home and adding to the rich texture of our coastal community.

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Katie Turner Carr

katie2I sit next to Katie and pepper her with questions, marveling at how the shy girl I met 23 years ago has blossomed into a self-assured wife, mother and businesswoman. When she left Fort Bragg in 1998 to attend UC Santa Cruz, she never imagined she’d return eight years later to become a sock maven.

It was probably inevitable that Katie became an entrepreneur. During her early years, her father Dave Turner owned a waterbed business in the Bay Area. When these beds waned in popularity and the internet became more consumer-friendly, he began selling waterbed accessories online. He also designed and began to manufacture a layered latex mattress system called a FloBed. Both enterprises allowed him to work anywhere. He fondly remembered growing up in Fort Bragg and wanted to give his four children the same opportunity. In 1992, he moved the family to the area.

Katie’s dream was to be an artist. After graduating from college in 2002, she stayed in Santa Cruz, sold her paintings through local crafts fairs, and made rent money by working at the Sock and Shoe Company. In 2004, her then boyfriend Marshall Carr got a job with Enterprise Rental Car. They moved to Morgan Hill. She worked briefly as a merchandizer for Lowes. “I was miserable. It’s the only job I ever quit.”

She was hired as a manager for Socks Galore in Gilroy. A few months later, the Sock and Shoe Company wooed her back and trained her as a buyer.

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Katie in her original tiny shop.

By 2006, Katie and Marshall decided their future was limited by the high cost of living in the Santa Cruz area. They hatched a brilliant idea—move to Fort Bragg and open a sock shop. She consulted her dad, who wasn’t convinced it could be successful. He asked her to write a detailed business plan that included statistics on the number of tourists visiting the area and how much merchandise she’d have to sell in order to make a living. After reviewing the plan, he rented her a 200 square-foot space at the front of his FloBeds store on Redwood Avenue.

Katie brainstormed names—Sockadeedoda, Sockadelic—before choosing to honor a favorite childhood storybook character—Pippi Longstockings. The tiny shop was off the beaten tourist path, but located across the street from the dance studio. While mothers waited for their children, they’d wander in to buy socks. “It was my busiest time of the day and helped me develop a local following.”

Katie also garnered attention among street people who were enamored with her tiny shop. She fondly remembers a man named Chris who’d stop by frequently, always beginning his visits with “Hey Pippi!” She hasn’t seen him in years, but this nickname is still used by some of her customers.

Katie6When a storefront on Laurel Street became available in June 2008, Katie moved Pippi’s, quadrupling her space and expanding her customer base. She was able to hire employees, which eased her workload and allowed her and now husband Marshall (a high school teacher) to start a family. They have two daughters—Rowan (seven) and Zoey (four).

“I’m so happy to be able to give my kids what I had—the freedom of a childhood in a small town. I want them to be able to play in the woods, on the beach or walk around downtown like I was able to, instead of hanging out in a mall.”

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Sweet Rachel & her great boss.

Katie has two employees. This author is especially fond of Rachel who is kind and patient. Whenever I’m in the shop babbling about something, she’ll smile and say in a soothing tone, “I understand.” She would make a great hostage negotiator or crazy person whisperer.

One of Katie’s favorite things about owning her business is the tourists who get excited to find a sock shop. “They literally squeal with delight.” Returning customers often show her the “Pippi’s socks” they’re wearing and ask to see the socks she has on.

Katie is grateful to live in a small town that has a big community feeling.  “I’m lucky to be a part of a place where one person can make a difference, where the opportunity to participate is just about everywhere. I love knowing my barista, the person who makes my lunch, and the people I support when I shop downtown. I also love that my customers know my family.”

When her dad Dave (the mayor) was the subject of a nasty recall effort last year, Katie wrote a heartfelt blog post defending him which sparked a movement in support of him.

Shortly after the demise of the recall, she joined forces with others to organize Go Fort Bragg, which encourages progressive involvement in the community. “Before this, I didn’t pay much attention to how the city was run. I voted for council members who shared my views and let them do their jobs. I’ve learned that these people aren’t mind readers. They need to hear the opinions of their constituents. I avoid anger and express my thoughts in positive ways. This gives them and others a chance to hear a point of view they may not have considered.”

Katie & her wonderful family.

Katie & her wonderful family.

Katie acknowledges that Fort Bragg has changed since her youth. There was the music store, the old recreation center pool where she was a lifeguard, a tree at Bainbridge Park that was fun to climb. The tree is gone and many businesses have closed. “I can still hang out at Headlands Coffee House, but don’t sit on the sidewalk as much anymore.” She says this with a wink. “The mill is gone, tourism is a more integral part of our economy, but we still have the beach, the woods, and a great community that watches out for one another. We have the CV Starr Center, the coastal trails, and the Noyo Center. A lot of positive changes have enriched our lives.”

Another positive change is Katie’s return. She’s brightened our town with her optimistic attitude and charming sock shop.Katie5